Jan 8, 2014

Posted by Shanell Calloway in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Quality Organic Compost in Connecticut

Quality Organic Compost in Connecticut

Compost is derived from shredded, well-aged plant matter such as grass, brush, wood chips, leaves and green plants that has begun to decompose and will eventually recycle into a reduced matter that can be added back to the ground. Over time, it will eventually turn into a type of natural fertilizer that helps improve and enrich soil. It will contain a variety of micro and macronutrients such as potassium, phosphorous and nitrogen.

The main uses for compost are organic farming, improving flowerbeds and gardening soil, and conditioning soil that is tilled. Compost in Connecticut is placed into a heap, periodically turned and rotated in order to insure proper aeration and breakup of the material. After a period of weeks or months, the materials break down into decaying plant matter, providing a balance of water retention, drainage and nutrients that will help plants flourish.

History

Composting is a centuries old practice that began as early as the Roman Empire in approximately A.D. 23. At its earliest use, organic materials were piled outside to decay until it was ready for use at the next planting season. This process required little effort for the farmer and worked well in temperate climates, but it did take up space that could not be used for planting. In addition, there was always the problem with insect infestation in the rotting food and plants, as well as the possibility of disease producing organisms.

Use

Today, composting is highly recommended as an enriching additive for soil that will help to improve the ground by supplying nutrients that produce a fertile growing medium. It helps hold moisture and soluble minerals and provides nutrients that help plants, vegetables, and flowers thrive. Compost in Connecticut enhances the structure of the soil and is normally used as a stabilizer that can be mixed with various matters such as bark chips, grit, or clay to boost the level of fertility in the soil. When mixed with soil or sand, it becomes a rich organic matter called loam. The soil becomes more workable, porous, and increases permeability, which helps reduce erosion.

Share

    Pin It on Pinterest

    Shares
    Share This